© The Churches in Wyberton & Frampton     14/01/2018                                                             Site Editor:                John Marshall
  The     Chancel     was     rebuilt     in     1760     after     settlement problems.   The   chancel   rebuilding   was   carried   out   at   the same     time     as     the     re-fronting     of     the     Rectory,     now Wyberton Park, by the Rector Dr. John Shaw. The   original   church   had   a   crossing   tower   which   collapsed in    1419.    It    was    discovered    by    the    Rector    John    Stokes.      Roger   Denys   was   engaged   to   rebuild   using   the   existing masonry.    Within    ten    months    he    had    reconstructed    the nave,   with   a   new   west   tower,   as   a   precaution   against   a repetition   of   the   disaster.      That   is   the   reason   there   why there is a sundial on the inside of the tower now. There are  many anomalies with the building.        The arcades are of five bays. The     south arcade    has p    l    a    i    n        piers      and d   o   u   b   l   e       arches,   but the      north arcade    has piers   of   four   major   and   four   minor   shafts,   one   capital   with nailhead,   and   double   chamfered   arches;   only   the   last   pier is   thinner,   quatrefoil   not   octofoil.   The   last   2   arches   are different   too,   one   chamfer   and   one   keeled   roll.   The   bases of   the   west   crossing   piers   can   be   seen.   The   piers   consisted of   triple   shafts   to   each   side   and   a   detached   shaft   in   each hollowed   out   diagonal.   The   chancel   arch   is   the   East   arch   of the   crossing,   and   the   east   responds   of   the   arches   into   the transepts   survive.   South   of   the   South   East   crossing   pier   is a   respond   for   an   arch   ,   so   we   know   that   the   chancel   was aisled. Records    in    the    Chancery    Court    refer    to    proceedings between   1426   and   1432   where   Roger   Denys,   a   London mason,   was   suing   for   payment   following   further   works. The    churchwardens    had    engaged    Roger    on    a    verbal agreement   alone.   The   country   was   experiencing   a   'period of    restraint'    and    payment    was    withheld    to    'the    great undoing   of   the   said   Roger'.   He   was   eventually   successful in   a   petition   to   the   Chancellor   of   England   and   no   doubt satisfied   when   the   churchwardens   were   ordered   to   pay him more than his original demand. The   church   was   further   restored   by   George   Gilbert   Scott Junior about 1880. It was thus described: 'Perpendicular     aisle     and     clerestory     windows,     much renewed   in   G.G.   Scott   Jun’s   restoration   of   1879   –   1881. Nave   roof   with   tie   beams   on   arched   braces   alternating with angels against principals'.
The Parishes of  Wyberton &  Frampton
Guide to St Leodegar The   parish   church   is   a   grade   I   listed   building   dedicated   to Saint    Leodegar    and    dating    from    the    late    12th    century. Leodegar   of   Poitiers   (also   known   as   Leodegarius,   Leger   or Léger)   (c.   615   AD   –679   AD)   was   a   martyred   Burgundian reforming   Abbot,   later   Bishop   of   Autun   who   became   Saint Leodegarius.    He    was    the    son    of    Saint    Sigrada    and    the brother   of   Saint   Warinus.   Leodegar   was   an   opponent   of Ebroin,   the   Frankish   Mayor   of   the   Palace   of   Neustria   and the    leader    of    the    faction    of    Austrasian    nobles    in    the struggle   for   control   over   the   waning   Merovingian   dynasty. He   was   blinded,   imprisoned   and   beheaded.   His   torture and death made him a martyr and saint.
Wyberton was mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086 when it consisted of 36 households and a church. Very   few   English   churches   share   a   dedication   to St     Leodegar.     His     annual     feast     day     is     2nd October.
Records    in    the    Chancery    Court    refer    to    proceedings between   1426   and   1432   where   Roger   Denys,   a   London mason,   was   suing   for   payment   following   further   works. The    churchwardens    had    engaged    Roger    on    a    verbal agreement    alone.    The    country    was    experiencing    a 'period   of   restraint'   and   payment   was   withheld   to   'the great    undoing    of    the    said    Roger'.    He    was    eventually successful   in   a   petition   to   the   Chancellor   of   England   and no     doubt     satisfied     when     the     churchwardens     were ordered to pay him more than his original demand.          The   church   was   further   restored   by   George   Gilbert Scott Junior about 1880. It was thus described: 'Perpendicular     aisle     and     clerestory     windows,     much renewed   in   G.G.   Scott   Jun’s   restoration   of   1879   –   1881. Nave   roof   with   tie   beams   on   arched   braces   alternating with angels against principals'.
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© Association of Lincoln Readers.                                                                 Site Editor:                John Marshall
The Parishes of Wyberton & Frampton
  The   Chancel   was   rebuilt   in   1760   after   settlement   problems.   The chancel   rebuilding   was   carried   out   at   the   same   time   as   the   re- fronting   of   the   Rectory,   now   Wyberton   Park,   by   the   Rector   Dr. John Shaw. The   original   church   had   a   crossing   tower   which   collapsed   in 1419.   It   was   discovered   by   the   Rector   John   Stokes.      Roger   Denys was   engaged   to   rebuild   using   the   existing   masonry.   Within   ten months   he   had   reconstructed   the   nave,   with   a   new   west   tower, as   a   precaution   against   a   repetition   of   the   disaster.      That   is   the reason   there   why there   is   a   sundial on    the    inside    of the tower now. There   are      many anomalies       with the building.        The    arcades    are of five bays. The     south     arcade     has     plain     octagonal     piers     and     double chamfered   arches,   but   the   north   arcade   has   piers   of   four   major and   four   minor   shafts,   one   capital   with   nailhead,   and   double chamfered   arches;   only   the   last   pier   is   thinner,   quatrefoil   not octofoil.   The   last   2   arches   are   different   too,   one   chamfer   and one   keeled   roll.   The   bases   of   the   west   crossing   piers   can   be seen.   The   piers   consisted   of   triple   shafts   to   each   side   and   a detached   shaft   in   each   hollowed   out   diagonal.   The   chancel   arch is   the   East   arch   of   the   crossing,   and   the   east   responds   of   the arches    into    the    transepts    survive.    South    of    the    South    East crossing   pier   is   a   respond   for   an   arch   ,   so   we   know   that   the chancel was aisled. Records   in   the   Chancery   Court   refer   to   proceedings   between 1426   and   1432   where   Roger   Denys,   a   London   mason,   was   suing for   payment   following   further   works.   The   churchwardens   had engaged   Roger   on   a   verbal   agreement   alone.   The   country   was experiencing   a   'period   of   restraint'   and   payment   was   withheld to    'the    great    undoing    of    the    said    Roger'.    He    was    eventually successful   in   a   petition   to   the   Chancellor   of   England   and   no doubt   satisfied   when   the   churchwardens   were   ordered   to   pay him more than his original demand. The   church   was   further   restored   by   George   Gilbert   Scott   Junior about 1880. It was thus described: 'Perpendicular   aisle   and   clerestory   windows,   much   renewed   in G.G.   Scott   Jun’s   restoration   of   1879   –   1881.   Nave   roof   with   tie beams     on     arched     braces     alternating     with     angels     against principals'.

St Leodegar Wyberton

The   parish   church   is   a   grade   I   listed   building   dedicated   to Saint    Leodegar    and    dating    from    the    late    12th    century. Leodegar   of   Poitiers   (also   known   as   Leodegarius,   Leger   or Léger)   (c.   615   AD   –679   AD)   was   a   martyred   Burgundian reforming   Abbot,   later   Bishop   of   Autun   who   became   Saint Leodegarius.    He    was    the    son    of    Saint    Sigrada    and    the brother   of   Saint   Warinus.   Leodegar   was   an   opponent   of Ebroin,   the   Frankish   Mayor   of   the   Palace   of   Neustria   and the    leader    of    the    faction    of    Austrasian    nobles    in    the struggle   for   control   over   the   waning   Merovingian   dynasty. He   was   blinded,   imprisoned   and   beheaded.   His   torture and death made him a martyr and saint.
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