Below   the   plaques   of   'THE   TEN   COMMANDMENTS' are   two   stone   tablets,   which   were   originally   sited   at the   front   of   the   former   Frampton   Church   of   England School,   which   was   sold   in   1997   and   demolished   in Spring   1998.   The   school   closed   in   July   1968.   A   semi- circular stone bears the inscription: +    RECEIVE    INSTRUCTION    THAT    THOU    MAYEST    BE WISE + A.D. 1877. Another   tablet   is   in   the   form   of   a   Sundial   and   bears the words: 'HEAVEN FAVOURS THE DILIGENT' ERECTED 1818. In   the   South   Aisle,   note   the   centre   window   depicting St. Mary, Patron Saint of this church; St. Hugh, Bishop of Lincoln, with his  swan and holding a model of his Cathedral Church, and St. Botolph with a model of Boston Parish Church (The Stump) at his feet.  By an old doorway arch, now occupied by the church heating panel, there is a fine oak medieval Vestry Chest, with hasps for three padlocks.   This   chest   was   cleaned   and   restored   by members   of   Frampton   W.I.   as   their   contribution   to the    European    Heritage    Year.        The    fine    Chandelier hanging   in   the   nave   holds   25   oil   candles   and   is   in regular      use      on      festive      and      other      important occasions.     The     quaint     inscription     on     the     boss proclaims   it   to   be   the   gift   of   Coney   Tunnard   Gent   in 1722.   The   rabbit   surmounting   the   boss   is   no   doubt   a visual pun on the name Coney. The   Tower   houses   a   peal   of   six   bells   -   the   earliest dated   1602.   The   blocked   elevated   doorway   in   the south-west    corner    of    the    tower    gave    access    to    a ringing   chamber   floor   at   that   level   at   some   earlier period.        The    modern    stone    altar    in    the    South Transept   was   erected   in   1955,   as   a   memorial   to   the Dennis   family.      Improvements   to   the   facilities   in   St. Mary's    were    made    in    the    latter    part    of    the    20th century,   with   the   addition   of   a   gas   fired   warm   air heating     system,     replacement     carpeting     for     the Chancel   and   Nave,   and   a   kitchen   and   toilet.      The   bell ropes were replaced in 1999. For   many   years   the   Font   was   housed   in   the   south- east    corner    of    the    tower,    until    such    time    as    it became    necessary    to    move    it    to    the    south-west corner,   to   enable   further   strengthening   of   the   tower support.   In   March   2000,   the   Font   was   moved   from the    south-west    corner,    to    the    Lady    Chapel    (south transept)    and    the    stone    altar    was    relocated    to    a more   central   position,   to   allow   for   the   new   Meeting Room    in    the    south-west    corner.    This    'Millennium Project'    was    completed    in    September    2001    and dedicated   by   The   Bishop   of   Grantham,   The   Rt.   Revd. Dr. Alastair Redfern on 17th March 2002. In   2009   the   church   was   re-wired   and   a   new   lighting scheme    was    installed.    It    was    dedicated    on    30th August   2009   by   the   Bishop   of   Lincoln,   The   Rt.   Revd. Dr.    John    Saxbee.        In    November    2013,    the    church audio     sound     system     and     induction     loop     was updated. In    April    2016    a    display    cabinet    was    installed    and dedicated    to    commemorate    those    killed    in    WW1. The     Parish     Council     donated     ceramic     poppies purchased     from     the     Tower     of     London     888,246       'Poppies   in   the   Moat'   display,   which   commemorated the   centenary   of   the   start   of   the   Great   War   in   1914. Shell   cases   were   also   donated   by   individuals   for   the display. The   poppies   represent   each   soldier   named   on   the Frampton   War   Memorial   and   Roll   of   Honour   (above cabinet)   who   died   between   1914   and   1918.      Also   in the   cabinet   is   the   'Death   Penny'   and   message   from King    George,    presented    to    the    family    of    Rifleman Ernest   James   Howell.   Remarkably   the   framed   plaque ended   up   in   Illinois   USA,   before   being   presented   to the church in 2009.   
© The Churches in Wyberton & Frampton                                                                  Site Editor:                John Marshall
  It   is   thought   that   this   earliest   recorded   church   would have   been   wooden,   and   that   it   was   soon   replaced   by   a Norman    stone-built    church    of    which    the    preset    Font Bowl   and   the   hidden   foundations   which   support   the present   pillars   of   the   Nave   are   the   only   remains.   The remainder   of   this   12th   century   church   was   pulled   down about    1350    and    the    present    church    was    built.    This comprised    the    Nave,    Aisles    and    South    Transept,    as remaining    today.    Major    restoration    work    was    carried out in 1889. The   Church   Organ   was   installed   in   1909   and   restored   in 1981. The   Nave   and   Aisles were     re-roofed     in 1930    but    in 2015, following   a   spate   of lead    thefts,    part    of the    south    roof    and crossing                 was replaced    with    'Tern Coated   Steel'.   At   the same     time,     vestry and      south      porch tiles were replaced. It       was       a       legal requirement    that    identifiable    bat    entry    points    were incorporated into the roofing material. During   work   on   this   £95,000   roofing   project,   graffiti   was discovered   on   a   piece   of   lead   above   the   Lady   Chapel crossing:   "FF   Hewitt   Kirton   1852"   was   inscribed   in   a   half shield.     Research     revealed     that     the     lead     worker (plumber)   was   Francis   Fisher   Hewitt   born   at   Kirton   in 1831. Originally   there   was   also   a   North   Transept   and   a   Rood Loft.    Missing    portions    of    the    moulding    and    the    high doorway   in   the   Chancel   arch   show   where   the   Rood   Loft was    accommodated.    On    the    south    side    of    the    arch under    the    small    window    which    houses    the    oldest stained   glass   in   the   church   is   an   opening   thought   to have    housed    a    Piscina,    which    would    indicate    the presence at some time of an altar on the rood loft. The   Chancel   of   the   14th   century   church   was   no   longer than   at   present.   At   some   time   between   1750   and   1850 the   east   end   of   the   Chancel   was   demolished   and   one   of the    side    windows    used    to    provide    the    present    east window.    The    stone    carving    around    the    doors    and recesses    in    the    Chancel    is    good,    although    suffering from    ageing.    It    is    interesting    to    note    the    measures taken   in   the   south   east   corner   to   preserve   one   recess   of the   Sedilia   with   its   carving.   The   recess   on   the   north   side of   the   Chancel   is   thought   to   have   housed   the   tomb   of the founder. During     the     same     period     the     North     Transept     was demolished   and   the   arches   which   spanned   the   east   end of   each   aisle   were   removed   because   they   were   causing the   pillars   to   lean.   The   Screen,   said   to   be   15th   century, is   believed   to   be   part   of   the   screen   which   at   one   time divided   the   Nave   from   the   transept   crossing.   Recesses in the Nave pillars show where this was fixed. The    Pulpit    is    of    oak    and    dates    from    the    mid    17th century.   It   was   purchased   from   Bourne   Abbey   for   the sum   of   £3-3-0   (£3.15p)   after   a   fire   there   and   installed   in its   present   position   in   1891.   Notches   cut   into   the   Nave Pillars   are   probably   connected   to   the   box   pews   which were   removed   in   the   1890   restoration.   At   one   time   the then    pulpit    with    reading    desk    was    attached    to    the second pillar from the chancel on the north side. In   the   South   Transept   is   a   monumental   effigy,   much damaged    and    of    unknown    origin;    it    is    thought    from details    of    the    costume    to    date    from    about    1300. `White's   Lincolnshire'   records   that   the   lady   is   Johanna de   Huntingford,   a   patron   of   the   church   in   1275,   but   this cannot be confirmed. Also   in   the   South   Transept   can   be   seen   the   Mensa   or stone   top   of   a   medieval   altar,   now   set   in   the   floor   as   the base   of   an   altar   table.   The   floor   tiles   in   the   Lady   Chapel are of medieval origin.
The Parishes of  Wyberton &  Frampton
Guide to St Mary The Virgin and      St Michael &  All Angels    > 'So by "indirect crooked ways" we reached Frampton, an out-of-the-world village, a spot where one might go in search of peace when weary of men's voices and their tread, of clamouring bells and whirl of wheels that pass'. 'Over Fen and Wold' - James John Hissey (1898) - page 243 (pdf 284)
The Domesday Survey lists a Parish church and a priest in Frampton in 1086 AD.   Our churches are still used for the purpose for which they were built - as a place where Christians can join together for worship and share fellowship with other members of the church and community.
The   vicar   of   Frampton   in   1863,   The   Revd.   John   Tunnard, M.A.,   lived   at   Frampton   House   and   was   a   considerable landowner.   The   condition   of   the   roads   from   Frampton West   to   the   parish   church   had   long   been   the   subject   of adverse    criticism    and    some    years    earlier,    the    vicar's father   had   found   it   necessary   to   take   down   the   mound on    which    the    former    mill    stood        at    Mill    Hill.    The materials   were   apparently   used   to   fill   up   the   holes   in the   road   to   Frampton   House,   as   the   vicar’s   wife   and daughters   were   so   badly   shaken   up   on   their   way   to   and from the church by carriage. For   some   years   The   Revd.   Tunnard   had   been   disturbed because   many   who   were   anxious   to   attend   the   parish church lived so far away from it. Some   elderly   residents   had   to   travel   three   miles   each way    to    church.    He    therefore    determined    to    erect    a church     at     the     west     end     of     the     parish     for     their convenience.   He   chose   as   the   site   a   grass   field   at   the back   of   his   residence,   at   first   planning   a   simple   building at    a    cost    of    £500.    When    this    became    known    to    his cousin,   John   Pearson,   this   gentleman   subscribed   £1,000 towards   the   cost   of   a   new   church...      `which   should   be an ornament to the parish'.
St Michael & All Angels
The church of St. Michael and All Angels was built of Ancaster stone in 1863 for The Revd. J. Tunnard. The architect was Mr James Fowler from Louth. The building consists of a nave, chancel and semi- octangular apse, with an organ chamber and vestry. It was apparently designed to accommodate 200 persons.
On   Monday,   27th   April   1863, the   corner   stone   was   laid   by Mrs    Tunnard,    at    the    north end   buttress   of   the   chancel. The   project   took   six   months to   complete   and   the   church was    dedicated    by    The    Right Revd.   John   Jackson,   Bishop   of Lincoln,    on    19th    November 1863. A    new    altar    to    replace    the original     wooden     table     was     consecrated     by     the Bishop   of   Lincoln,   the   Right   Revd.   Kenneth   Riches   on the 9th May, 1958.  A   vestry   screen   was   added,   in   memory   of   a   member of the congregation who died in 1999. A   stained   glass   memorial   window   was   installed   in 2008, reflecting the location in a rural community. On   24th   November   2013,   a   special   service   was   held to    commemorate    the    150th    anniversary    of    the church.

St Mary’s Roofing Project 2015-2016

Lead     Graffiti     found during roof works
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Below: Spire Belfry in rows - North, South, East, West. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th level left to right.

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© The Churches in Wyberton & Frampton  Site Editor:                John Marshall
The Parishes of Wyberton & Frampton
  It   is   thought   that   this   earliest   recorded   church   would   have   been wooden,   and   that   it   was   soon   replaced   by   a   Norman   stone-built church   of   which   the   preset   Font   Bowl   and   the   hidden   foundations which    support    the    present    pillars    of    the    Nave    are    the    only remains.   The   remainder   of   this   12th   century   church   was   pulled down    about    1350    and    the    present    church    was    built.    This comprised    the    Nave,    Aisles    and    South    Transept,    as    remaining today. Major restoration work was carried out in 1889. The Church Organ was installed in 1909 and restored in 1981. The   Nave   and   Aisles   were   re-roofed   in   1930   but   in 2015,   following a   spate   of   lead   thefts,   part   of   the   south   roof   and   crossing   was replaced   with   'Tern   Coated   Steel'.   At   the   same   time,   vestry   and south porch tiles were replaced. It   was   a   legal   requirement   that   identifiable   bat   entry   points   were incorporated into the roofing material. During     work     on     this     £95,000     roofing     project,     graffiti     was discovered   on   a   piece   of   lead   above   the   Lady   Chapel   crossing:   "FF Hewitt    Kirton    1852"    was    inscribed    in    a    half    shield.    Research revealed   that   the   lead   worker   (plumber)   was   Francis   Fisher   Hewitt born at Kirton in 1831. Originally    there    was    also    a    North    Transept    and    a    Rood    Loft. Missing   portions   of   the   moulding   and   the   high   doorway   in   the Chancel   arch   show   where   the   Rood   Loft   was   accommodated.   On the   south   side   of   the   arch   under   the   small   window   which   houses the   oldest   stained   glass   in   the   church   is   an   opening   thought   to have    housed    a    Piscina,    which    would    indicate    the    presence    at some    time    of    an    altar    on    the rood loft. The   Chancel   of   the   14th   century church    was    no    longer    than    at present.   At   some   time   between 1750   and   1850   the   east   end   of the   Chancel   was   demolished   and one   of   the   side   windows   used   to provide        the        present        east window.      The      stone      carving around   the   doors   and   recesses in   the   Chancel   is   good,   although suffering      from      ageing.      It      is interesting   to   note   the   measures   taken   in   the   south   east   corner   to preserve   one   recess   of   the   Sedilia   with   its   carving.   The   recess   on the   north   side   of   the   Chancel   is   thought   to   have   housed   the   tomb of the founder. During   the   same   period   the   North   Transept   was   demolished   and the    arches    which    spanned    the    east    end    of    each    aisle    were removed    because    they    were    causing    the    pillars    to    lean.    The Screen,    said    to    be    15th    century,    is    believed    to    be    part    of    the screen   which   at   one   time   divided   the   Nave   from   the   transept crossing. Recesses in the Nave pillars show where this was fixed. The   Pulpit   is   of   oak   and   dates   from   the   mid   17th   century.   It   was purchased   from   Bourne   Abbey   for   the   sum   of   £3-3-0   (£3.15p) after   a   fire   there   and   installed   in   its   present   position   in   1891. Notches   cut   into   the   Nave   Pillars   are   probably   connected   to   the box   pews   which   were   removed   in   the   1890   restoration.   At   one time    the    then    pulpit    with    reading    desk    was    attached    to    the second pillar from the chancel on the north side. In   the   South   Transept   is   a   monumental   effigy,   much   damaged   and of   unknown   origin;   it   is   thought   from   details   of   the   costume   to date   from   about   1300.   `White's   Lincolnshire'   records   that   the   lady is   Johanna   de   Huntingford,   a   patron   of   the   church   in   1275,   but this cannot be confirmed. Also   in   the   South   Transept   can   be   seen   the   Mensa   or   stone   top   of a   medieval   altar,   now   set   in   the   floor   as   the   base   of   an   altar   table. The floor tiles in the Lady Chapel are of medieval origin.
St Michael & All Angels  For some years The Revd. Tunnard had been disturbed because many who were anxious to attend the parish church lived so far away from it. Some elderly residents had to travel three miles each way to church. He therefore determined to erect a church at the west end of the parish for their convenience. He chose as the site a grass field at the back of his residence, at first planning a simple building at a cost of £500. When this became known to his cousin, John Pearson, this gentleman subscribed £1,000 towards the cost of a new church... `which should be an ornament to the parish'. On Monday, 27th April 1863, the corner stone was laid by Mrs Tunnard, at the north end buttress of the chancel. The project took six months to complete and the church was dedicated by The Right Revd. John Jackson, Bishop of Lincoln, on 19th November 1863.  A new altar to replace the original wooden table was consecrated by the Bishop of Lincoln, the Right Revd. Kenneth Riches on the 9th May, 1958.   A vestry screen was added, in memory of a member of the congregation who died in 1999.  A stained glass memorial window was installed in 2008, reflecting the location in a rural community.  On 24th November 2013, a special service was held to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the church. St Michael's and St Mary's churches are both kept in good repair with the support of the congregation and local community, including fundraising events organised by Friends of Frampton Churches.
St Michael’s
   St Mary’s
'So by "indirect crooked ways" we reached Frampton, an out-of-the- world village, a spot where one might go in search of peace when weary of men's voices and their tread, of clamouring bells and whirl of wheels that pass'. 'Over Fen and Wold' - James John Hissey (1898) - page 243 (pdf 284)
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<        Lead    Graffiti    found during roof works
Below: Spire Belfry in rows - North, South, East, West. 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th level left to right.

Use << <  >  >> to

move to 2nd page.

Touch or click to view enlarged image.